Grace from the Whirlwind: The Henryville Tornado Five Years Later

By Cade Campbell

Today, March 2, 2017 is the five year anniversary of the EF4 tornado that struck Henryville, Indiana in 2012. Cade Campbell is one of the pastors at First Baptist Church Henryville and was there when the storm hit and in the days after. This article is adapted for the anniversary from an article that Cade wrote that was published by Baptist Press (BP) on March 16, 2012, “Grace from the Whirlwind.”


O worship the King all-glorious above,
O gratefully sing his power and his love:
our shield and defender, the Ancient of Days,
pavilioned in splendor and girded with praise.

O tell of his might and sing of his grace,
whose robe is the light, whose canopy space.
His chariots of wrath the deep thunderclouds form,
and dark is his path on the wings of the storm…

– Robert Grant, “O Worship the King”

henryville-tornado-3 Continue reading “Grace from the Whirlwind: The Henryville Tornado Five Years Later”

Offices of Christ

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By Evan Knies

A few Sunday nights ago, we walked through this study with our students. These notes are adapted from Wayne Grudem’s Systematic. 

There were three major offices among the people of Israel in the Old Testament: the prophet (Nathan, 2 Sam. 7:2), priest (Abiathar, 1 Sam. 30:7), and king (David, 2 Sam. 5:3). In the Old Testament the prophet spoke God’s Words to the people, the priest offered sacrifices, prayers, and praises to God on the behalf of the people, and the King ruled over the people as God’s representative. These offices foreshadowed Christ and his work. Christ is the final prophet as is the Old Testament in Incarnate. The Word has become flesh as the Gospel of John. But in Hebrews 1, God has spoken in His Son. Jesus is the final Word.  Religions like Islam fail because they see Christ as a good prophet, Muhammad as a better prophet. Jesus is not a prophet, He is the prophet. God’s Word is final in his son. Christ is the final priest because he offers himself as a sacrifice on our behalf. He is King because he rules over the church and the universe. Continue reading “Offices of Christ”

Azazel and Yom Kippur: Understanding the Scapegoat of Leviticus 16

By Billy Doolittle

scapegoat

Leviticus 16 most notably gives the origin of Yom Kippur, the Jewish holy day in which Israel atones for their sin. Two sacrifices occur within Leviticus 16. Aaron is commanded by the Lord to sacrifice a bull and sprinkle its blood on the mercy seat. The blood of that bull atones for Aaron’s sin (Lev 16:11). Then, he sacrifices a goat for the people’s transgression and to atone for the “Holy Place” (Lev 16:16-17) because Israel’s sin infected the Tent of Meeting. Aaron then is commanded to take a second goat, lay both his hands on the goat, and confess all of the sins of Israel on the goat and send it into the wilderness to “לַעֲזָאזֵֽל” (Azazel; Lev 16:8,10,21). “Israel’s sins were thus carried away” out of the camp and into the wilderness. Being that “Azazel” only occurs in scripture within this chapter, great mystery surrounds the goat that was sent into the wilderness. Continue reading “Azazel and Yom Kippur: Understanding the Scapegoat of Leviticus 16”

Israel of God

By Evan Knies

In Galatians 6:16, Paul uses the phrase “Israel of God”. He calls the Galatians the “Israel of God” to show that there is one People united in the Son. The Israel of God is the blood bought, elect, bride of Christ. In Him and because of Him, “Israel” receives her promises. In Him, the True Israel receives the blessings and promises bestowed on them because of the work of the Son. Continue reading “Israel of God”

Book Briefs: Textuality and the Bible by Michael B. Shepherd

By Billy Doolittle

textuality-and-the-bibleDr. Michael Shepherd is Associate Professor of Biblical Studies at Cedarville University in Cedarville, Ohio. He earned his M.Div and PhD from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary under the guidance of Dr. John Sailhamer. He has published many works including The Text in the Middle, Daniel in the Context of the Hebrew Bible, The Textual World of the Bible, and others. He was awarded with 4 other professors for notable scholars by the Southeastern Evangelical Fellowship during the 67th annual ETS meeting in Atlanta. In Textuality and the Bible, he explores the validity of the Bible being a text in a unique combination of genre and faith producing history and theology while not strictly being confined to a historical or theological book. Rather the Bible is at its core a literary work. “It is thus necessary to describe it in textual, literary, and even linguistic terms” (xi). Shepherd will explore different arguments for defending how the Bible should be read in the manner it was a written: as a book, in order to properly train the church.

Continue reading “Book Briefs: Textuality and the Bible by Michael B. Shepherd”