The Church and Generation Z

In the Spring of 2020, Seth York taught a class at Buck Run Baptist Church on The Church and Generation Z. Buck Run recorded six helpful videos and they are available below.

Quotes from “The Ascension of Christ” by Patrick Schreiner

Patrick Schreiner is a New Testament professor at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He has also written The Kingdom of God and the Glory of the Cross and Matthew, Disciple and Scribe.

This book may be only 127 pages, but it packs a punch!

Purchase a copy here.

  1. The arc of the moral universe is long, but the Messiah’s ascension determines its finale. (pg. xv)
  2. If the resurrection fully confirms Jesus’ lordship, then the ascension becomes an anticlimax. We can have the tendency to cut off what is implicit in the apostles’ presentation and only speak of the resurrection. (pg. 6)
  3. The ascension culminated Christ’s earthly work and marks a shift and climax in the Messiah’s three key roles. It not only confirms Christ’s work but continues Christ’s work. He once labored on the earth; now he labors in heaven. (pg. 17)
  4. While we tend to relegate the climax of Christ’s prophetic work to his days on the earth, the biblical authors look at Christ’s work as a whole. They intentionally expand Christ’s prophetic work to both his earthly life and his continuing life in heaven. (pg. 25)
  5. Christ arrived as the prophet who delivered God’s word, performed signs and wonders, and possessed the Spirit on the earth. He fulfilled the old covenant by being the anointed Prophet. However, he also promised a time when he would leave and this prophetic task would continue and also be transferred to his people. It is not that he would not be involved; he would simply be involved in a different way after his ascent into heaven. (pg. 30)
  6. Because Christ currently presents his blood in the heavenly temple, we are able to also ascend the mountain of the Lord and enter into the throne room of God. (pg. 46)
  7. Jesus did not adorn himself with humanity to simply discard it. He adorned himself with humanity so that he might perfect humanity as our true priest. (pg. 60)
  8. Jesus is not embarrassed by his people. He proudly represents his people as the God-Man before the Father. Like the priests of old, he wears you as jewels on his breastplate. (pg. 66)
  9. Jesus did not simply come to the earth to conquer. He ascended to the right hand of the Father to receive his rightful rule. In doing this, his work as king culminates and continues. Kings sit down and are installed in order to rule. (pg.75)
  10. The resurrection vindicated Christ, but his ascent confirmed that vindication. (pg. 110)

JC Ryle on Practical Christian Holiness

JC Ryle (1816-1900) was the first bishop of Liverpool. He wrote many helpful works such as Holiness, Knots Untied, Light from Old Times, and Practical Religion.

Below is a quote from Practical Religion on Practical Christian Holiness (Banner of Truth), pages 11-12

“It is as certain as anything in the Bible that ‘without holiness no man shall see the Lord’ (Heb. 12:14). It is equally certain that it is the invariable fruit of saving faith, the real test of regeneration, the only sound evidence of indwelling grace, the certain consequence of vital union with Christ. – Holiness is not absolute perfection and freedom from all faults. Nothing of the kind! The wild words of some who talk of enjoying ‘unbroken communion with God’ for many mouths, are greatly to be deprecated, because they raise unscriptural exceptions in the minds of young believers, and so do harm. Absolute perfection is for heaven, and not for earth, where we have a weak body, a wicked world, and a busy devil continually near our souls. Nor is real Christian holiness ever attained, or maintained, without a constant fight and struggle. The great apostle, who said ‘I fight, -I labour, – I keep under my body and bring it into subjection’ (1 Cor. 9:27), would have been amazed to hear of sanctification without personal exertion, and to be told that believers only need to sit still, and everything will be done for them!

Yet, weak and imperfect as the holiness of the best saints may be, it is a real true thing, and has a character about it as unmistakable as light and salt. It is not a thing which begins and ends with noisy profession: it will be seen much more than heard. Genuine scriptural holiness will make a man do his duty at home and by the fireside, and adorn his doctrine in the little trials of daily life. It will exhibit itself in passive graces as well as in active. It will make a man humble, kind, gentle, unselfish, good-tempered, considerate for others, loving, meek, and forgiving. It will not constrain him to go out of the world, and shut himself up in a cave, like a hermit. But it will make him do his duty in that state to which God has called him, on Christian principles, and after the pattern of Christ. Such holiness, I know well, is not common. It is a style of practical Christianity which is painfully rare in these days. but I can find no other standard of holiness in the Word of God, – no other which comes up to the pictures drawn by our Lord and his apostles. In an age like this no reader can wonder if I press this subject also on men’s attention. Once more let us ask, – In the matter of holiness, how is it with our souls? ‘How do we do’?”