15 Quotes from Reformed Preaching by Joel Beeke

1. The Truth of Christ must be brought home to the heart by the Holy Spirit in order to produce love (pg. 23).

2. Faith opens a window to see into heaven, but experiential knowledge brings a foretaste of heaven into the soul (pg. 48).

3. Reformed preaching is declaring biblical truth to promote biblical spirituality as it was rediscovered in the Reformation of the sixteenth century (pg. 58).

4. Preaching Christ is the only way to give solid comfort to suffering people (pg. 60).

5. The holiness of a minister’s heart is not merely an ideal; it is absolutely necessary for his work to be effective. Holiness of life be his consuming passion (pg. 67). reformedpreachingimage

6. If a man teach uprightly and walk crookedly, more will fall down in the night of his life than he built in the day of his doctrine (pg. 69).

7. The law is no means for sinners to find justification before God, but it is also no enemy of grace (pg. 75).

8. Preachers who preach casually convey the impression that they do not have anything really important to say (pg. 77).

9. The church today desperately needs preachers whose private prayers season their pulpit messages, and who continually remind themselves that awakening, heart engaging, life-transforming preaching does not depend on ministerial eloquence, self-generated passion, or powers of persuasion, but on the sovereign good pleasure of God operating through the ministry of the Holy Spirit (pg. 81).

10. Half-hearted piety slowly bleeds away the minister’s strength (pg. 83).

11. If the heart of the preacher is increasingly sanctified toward God, his preaching gains new depths and nuances that reflect his spiritual growth (pg. 85).

12. Preaching is the instrument and the authority that the Spirit uses in His saving work of illuminating, converting, and sealing sinners (pg. 112-113).

13. The true knowledge of God results in pious activity that aims to go beyond personal salvation to embrace the glory of God (pg. 117).

14. Where God’s glory is not served, true piety cannot exist (pg. 117).

15. Effective preaching does not merely inform people about God; it glorifies God (pg. 388).


Evan Knies is from West Monroe, LA. He is married to Lauren and Father to Maesyn. He serves as Minister of Students at Bullitt Lick Baptist Church in Shepherdsville, KY. He also serves as the Executive Assistant of the Nelson Baptist Association. He is a graduate of Boyce College and The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. You can follow him on Twitter @Evan_Knies

15 Quotes from Prayer by John Onwuchekwa

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John Onwuchekwa serves as pastor of Cornerstone Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Prayer: How Praying Together Shapes the Church is apart of the Building Healthy Churches series published by Crossway.

Pick up a copy here

 

 


Prayer is breathing. There’s no better metaphor of what prayer should be for the Christian. (pg. 17)

 

Our churches prayers get reduced to a tool for transitioning from one activity to the next. (pg. 17)

 

God rewards the prayers of novices, which encourages consistent prayer in the lives of His people. (pg. 24)

 

Calling on the name of the Lord is more than just saying His name aloud. Throughout the Bible, the name of the Lord is synonymous with the nature of the Lord. To call on His name is to make an appeal to His character. (pg. 33)

 

If prayer clings to the hope we share in Christ, then prayer should reflect our togetherness in Christ. If prayer has a gospel shape, then by implication it must have a church shape. (pg. 37)

 

If your life’s primary concern is to make your name great, you’ll be uncomfortable in Christian community. (pg. 52)

 

The local church takes the theory of Christianity and makes it tangible – in love, deed, and especially in prayer. (pg. 62)

 

When we pray together, we want to address the misconceptions about God, pray for those things many of us neglect, and show that substantial prayer doesn’t have to take a substantial amount of time. (pg. 78)

 

A community that routinely confesses sin together is a community that is glad, growing, gracious, and grounded. (pg. 82)

 

A prayerful community of confession is a peaceful community. (pg. 84)

 

A church that practices prayer is more than a church that learns; it’s also a church that leans. (pg. 92)

 

Gathering to pray helps us embrace our responsibility to each other while allowing us to be content with our limitations. We’re no one’s saviors. Prayer allows us to leave things unfinished in the lives of people. (pg. 104)

 

Successful evangelism isn’t measured by the end result, but by our faithfulness to the task. (pg. 113)

 

Prayer replaces apathy with compassion. (pg. 115)

 

Cultivating prayer in the life of the church is a marathon, not a sprint. (pg. 125)


Evan Knies is from West Monroe, LA. He is married to Lauren. He serves as Minister of Students at Bullitt Lick Baptist Church in Shepherdsville, KY. He also serves as the Executive Assistant of the Nelson Baptist Association. He is a graduate of Boyce College and presently an M.DIV student at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in the Billy Graham School. You can follow him on Twitter @Evan_Knies

Part 3: The Theology of the Book of the Twelve and Daniel, a Thematic Approach

By Billy Doolittle

twelveSeeing the restoration of Israel in the book of the twelve changes the tone of the books as the Lord displays both wrath and mercy. Ground zero of Israel’s restoration is Jerusalem and Mount Zion.  The people of Jerusalem, as referred to in Daniel and the book of the twelve, is the nation of Israel and Judah (Dan 9:7; Zech 8:22; 9:9; 12:5, 8, 10; 13:1).  The Lord sits in Jerusalem and speaks from the city (Joel 3:16) and it will endure forever (Joel 3:20). The seventy sevens from Daniel 9 details the restoration which will take place after the desolator comes and destroys it.  After it is desolated, the Lord will restore the city and rebuild it. Israel’s disobedience to the Lord causes the city’s destruction (Micah 3:12).  Here in the city, many will come, and the Lord tells them to take their farming tools and beat them into weapons so that a war may wage on the city fronts (Joel 3:10).   Continue reading “Part 3: The Theology of the Book of the Twelve and Daniel, a Thematic Approach”

Part 2: Theology of the Book of the Twelve and Daniel, a Thematic Approach

day of the LordBy Billy Doolittle

The day of the Lord appears as a thick darkness that covers the whole land with no sun and no moon (Amos 5:18), as famine and thirst (Amos 8:9), as the Lord splitting the earth and melting the hills (Hab 3:16), and the day will be bitter and mighty men will cry, a unique day in which the sun will not shine nor will it be dark, and it will not be cold or hot, but it will only be known to the Lord (Zech 14:6).  The day will be filled with anguish, distress, ruin, devastation, gloom, and then the trumpets will blast, and a battle with presume (Zeph 1:14-15). The day will be full of devastation and a day will contain punishment against all those who did evil in the land and those oppressed Israel.   Continue reading “Part 2: Theology of the Book of the Twelve and Daniel, a Thematic Approach”