2021 Reading List – Creston Thomas

Creston Thomas is a native from Pine Bluff, AR. He is married to Alina and they have 6 beautiful children. He is also a recent graduate from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary with a degree in Biblical and Theological Studies. Currently, Creston is pastoring at Christ The Redeemer in his hometown.

For more information about Christ The Redeemer, click here.

James Montgomery Boice – Genesis: An Expositional Commentary, Vol. 1: Genesis 1-11 (Reading Chapters 3-8)

Kent Hughes – Acts (Preaching the Word): The Church Afire (Reading Chapters 7-15)

Richard C. Barcellos- Recovering a Covenantal Heritage: Essays in Baptist Covenant Theology

Thabiti – The Life of God in the Soul of the Church: The Root and Fruit of Spiritual Fellowship

Jerry Bridges – The Practice of Godliness

D. H. Dilbeck- Frederick Douglass: America’s Prophet

Jeffrey D. Johnson – The Absurdity of Unbelief: A Worldview Apologetic of the Christian Faith

Vocab Malone – Barack Obama Vs the Black Hebrew Israelites: Introduction to the History & Beliefs of 1west Hebrew Israelism

Jeffrey D. Johnson – The Five Points of Amillennialism

Albert N. Martin – Pastoral Theology, The Man of God: His Calling and Godly Life (Vol. 1)

Craftiness of the Serpent and the Sovereign God: Joseph

By Evan Knies

In the later part of the book of Genesis readers are confronted with the story of Joseph. His jealous brothers sell Joseph into slavery and he is brought to Egypt. Joseph is put in places by God to carry out His Will. Before Joseph was second in command in Egypt, he did not give into temptation by laying with Pharaoh’s wife. Joseph is punished by not giving into sin.

By this action of Joseph being imprisoned, Pharaoh at a later date realizes that there is one who can interpret a dream that he has received. Pharaoh calls Joseph up to interpret a dream and throughout Joseph’s life he has remained faithful. Joseph tells of the famine that is coming and by doing this Egypt is allowed to prepare. God has taken this evil act of his brothers sending him into slavery; the tempting of Pharaoh’s wife and God is bringing all of this about for His glory. Joseph’s struggle brought life to his family and to Egypt. He saves the entire kingdom. (Victor Hamilton also compares Joseph and his brother’s evil intentions to those who conspired against Noah).[1]

When Joseph is sees his brothers again after all that has taken place, Joseph is able to say that God had brought this about. His brothers meant evil and harm against him, but God used it to save them (Genesis 50:19). Joseph uses the verb “sent” to show that it was God who brought him to Egypt, not his brothers.[3] Even though Joseph’s own flesh and blood are the ones who sold him into slavery, God providentially brought about their evil deed against Joseph to save the kingdom. The Lord placed Joseph as a leader in Egypt to keep a remnant that would continue to exist and Scripture bears this out in Exodus 1.

[1] Hamilton, Genesis, 706.

[2] Hamilton, Genesis, 577.