The Reformation Means Resurrection

By Evan Knies

On the morning of October 31st 2016, my cousin’s body was laid in the grave. It has been a tough year since his passing. He was like my older brother and he impacted those he came in contact with. My cousin had his own struggles and faults, but he had his hope rested in the gospel! The temptations he faced were great, but Christ died for his past, present, and future sins. As our family has grieved losing him in this life, we have often been reminded of the hope the gospel offers. Those who repent, turning from their sin, and trusting in Christ by faith alone will be saved. Since Christ was raised from the grave, He will raise His people from the grave!

2 Corinthians 4:14 – For we know that the one who raised the Lord Jesus will also raise us with Jesus and present us with you. 

For those in Christ, our hope is in the gospel of grace! But October 31st also marks another important event. 500 years ago, Luther nailed the 95 theses on the Wittenberg Church door sparking the Reformation. One of the main goals of the Reformation was to get back to the fundamental teaching in the Scriptures that salvation comes by Grace Alone, through Faith Alone, in Christ Alone.  The Reformation was getting back to the seriousness of the gospel! We need to be reminded every day of the gospel and the implications it brings. Christians rest in the finished work of Christ, not that of indulgences, popes, or councils. Christ is enough.

In our suffering and sorrows, may we run to Christ and read the Scriptures with gladness. In our debates or doubts, may we run to our Lord who holds us up. May we be disciplined in the scriptures, knowing what they say, keeping others accountable so that none may fall astray. May we continue to run the race until we see our King. There may be various ways you celebrate this Reformation Day, may you do so with joy! But may we also recognize that we have been given one life to make much of Christ, may we be willing to lay down our lives for the sake of the gospel in our local churches, communities, and the nations.

I am writing this for a few reasons: 1) I want to honor Josh and remember him by writing, 2) when some often talk about the Reformation, we fail to address the Resurrection, 3) I feel the need to get back to the gospel and the importance of Scripture in every day life. I hope when reading this post you are reminded that we are not promised tomorrow. We only get one life and it will soon pass. Only what is done for Christ will last!

________________________________________________________

Evan Knies is from West Monroe, LA. He is married to Lauren. He serves as Minister of Students at Bullitt Lick Baptist Church in Shepherdsville, KY. He also serves as the Executive Assistant of the Nelson Baptist Association. He is a graduate of Boyce College and presently an M.DIV student at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in the Billy Graham School. You can follow him on Twitter @Evan_Knies

Grace from the Whirlwind: The Henryville Tornado Five Years Later

By Cade Campbell

Today, March 2, 2017 is the five year anniversary of the EF4 tornado that struck Henryville, Indiana in 2012. Cade Campbell is one of the pastors at First Baptist Church Henryville and was there when the storm hit and in the days after. This article is adapted for the anniversary from an article that Cade wrote that was published by Baptist Press (BP) on March 16, 2012, “Grace from the Whirlwind.”


O worship the King all-glorious above,
O gratefully sing his power and his love:
our shield and defender, the Ancient of Days,
pavilioned in splendor and girded with praise.

O tell of his might and sing of his grace,
whose robe is the light, whose canopy space.
His chariots of wrath the deep thunderclouds form,
and dark is his path on the wings of the storm…

– Robert Grant, “O Worship the King”

henryville-tornado-3 Continue reading “Grace from the Whirlwind: The Henryville Tornado Five Years Later”

Offices of Christ

wordswag_1488297204553

By Evan Knies

A few Sunday nights ago, we walked through this study with our students. These notes are adapted from Wayne Grudem’s Systematic. 

There were three major offices among the people of Israel in the Old Testament: the prophet (Nathan, 2 Sam. 7:2), priest (Abiathar, 1 Sam. 30:7), and king (David, 2 Sam. 5:3). In the Old Testament the prophet spoke God’s Words to the people, the priest offered sacrifices, prayers, and praises to God on the behalf of the people, and the King ruled over the people as God’s representative. These offices foreshadowed Christ and his work. Christ is the final prophet as is the Old Testament in Incarnate. The Word has become flesh as the Gospel of John. But in Hebrews 1, God has spoken in His Son. Jesus is the final Word.  Religions like Islam fail because they see Christ as a good prophet, Muhammad as a better prophet. Jesus is not a prophet, He is the prophet. God’s Word is final in his son. Christ is the final priest because he offers himself as a sacrifice on our behalf. He is King because he rules over the church and the universe. Continue reading “Offices of Christ”

Donald Trump and the Evangelical Vote

By Obbie Todd

For years scholars have debated the validity of “secularization theory,” the idea that, as society progresses, religion will irrevocably lose its authority in the public square and in society as a whole. In his monumental work A Secular Age (2007), philosopher Charles Taylor described this view as the “disenchanting” of the world through modernity, or the draining of the spiritual realm from the material. A generation of Dispensational premillennial Christians raised on the Scofield Reference Bible and Left Behind theology have perhaps unconsciously imbibed this worldview. However others aren’t as pessimistic about the trajectory of our culture. According to ecumenicist Lesslie Newbigin, “There are good grounds for saying that the secularization theory has been accepted uncritically by Christians to justify a social institution.” (The Gospel in a Pluralist Society, 215) Can a developed society actually elevate the role of religion in its political and moral culture over Continue reading “Donald Trump and the Evangelical Vote”

Book Briefs: Practical Religion By JC Ryle

JC Ryle was born in 1816. He was ordained in the Church of England in 1841. He became the rector of St. Thomas’s, Winchester in 1843, then to Helmingham, Suffolk the following year. From 1843 to 1879, he wrote various works and gospel tracts. In 1880, Ryle became the bishop of Liverpool and retired in 1900 at age 83. He died later that year.fullsizeoutput_5b9

I have benefited from the writings of Bunyan, Calvin, Luther, etc. But none have been more beneficial than JC Ryle. In his work Practical Religion, Ryle cuts to the heart of the Christian life. He saw problems in his day and addressed those. But those same problems are present today.

Practical Religion is divided into 21 Chapters: Self-Inquiry, Self-Exertion, Reality, Prayer, Bible Reading, Going to the Table, Charity, Zeal, Freedom, Happiness, Formality, The World, Riches and Poverty, The Best Friend, Sickness, The Family of God, Our Home, Heirs of God, The Great Gathering, The Great Separation, and Eternity.fullsizeoutput_5b8

Ryle addressed the skewed views of the gospel of grace such as “nominal Christianity”. Ryle calls it “churchianity”. But it is the same problem that still exists in many of our Churches today. Some claim Christ when it benefits them, but when life is tough, those  “nominal” believers are found not to be true. In reading Practical Religionthe Christian will be encouraged in Praying and Reading their Bible. But they will also feel conviction on living this life for eternity, not for the “here and now”.

fullsizeoutput_5baI am thankful to God for the life of JC Ryle and his influence in my life. But I am also thankful for Banner of Truth for publishing his works and other various works that are so important for the Christian life.

If you would like to purchase Practical Religion, you may do so here.

Banner has recently released Ryle’s Autobiography, you can purchase it here.


Evan Knies is a student at SBTS, grad of Boyce College, and Minister of Students at Bullitt Lick Baptist Church in Shepherdsville, Kentucky. He is married to Lauren and you can follow him on Twitter at @Evan_Knies.