15 Quotes from Foundations of the Christian Faith

IMG_7509

 

James Montgomery Boice was the pastor of Tenth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia until his death in 2000. He also wrote a book called “The Doctrines of Grace” which was heavily influential in my life.

To purchase a copy of Foundations of the Christian Faith, click here.

 

 

1. Knowledge of God takes place in the context of Christian piety, worship, and devotion (pg. 9).

2. A weak god produces no strong followers, nor does he deserve to be worshiped. A strong God, the God of the Bible, is a source of strength to those who know Him (pg. 12).

3. To know God would require change (pg. 19).

4. The church did not create the canon; if it had, it would place itself over Scripture. Rather the church submitted to Scripture as a higher authority (pg. 34).

5. The power of the living Christ operating by means of the Holy Spirit through the written Word changes lives (pg. 56).

6. A God who needs to be defended is no God. Rather, the God of the Bible is the self-existent one who is the true defender of His people (pg. 95).

7. Because God knows, believers can rest (pg. 134).

8. The blessings of salvation come, not by fighting against God’s ways or by hating Him for what we consider to be an injustice, but rather by accepting His verdict on our true nature as fallen beings and turning to Christ in faith for salvation (pg. 204).

9. The initiating cause in salvation is God’s free grace, but the formal cause is, and has always been, the death of the mediator (pg. 259).

10. In the act of propitiation, we have the great good news that the one who is our Creator, but from whom we have turned in sin, is nevertheless at the same time our Redeemer (pg. 322).

11. Only after we have come to appreciate the meaning of the Cross can we appreciate the love behind it. Seeing this, Augustine once called the Cross “a pulpit” from which Christ preached God’s love to the world (pg. 337).

12. To confess that Jesus is the Christ is to confess the Christ of the Scriptures. To deny that Christ, by whatever means, is heresy – a heresy with terrible consequences (pg. 445).

13. If we are secure in Christ, although we may stumble and fall, we know that nothing will ever pluck us out of Christ’s hand (pg. 464).

14. Living by grace actually leads to holiness, for our desire is to please the one who has saved us by that grace (pg. 492).

15. Perseverance means that once one is in the family of God, he or she is always in that family (pg. 534).

For more information on Foundations of the Christian Faith, visit Intervarsity Press here.


Evan Knies is from West Monroe, LA. He is married to Lauren and father to Maesyn. He serves as Minister of Students at Bullitt Lick Baptist Church in Shepherdsville, KY. He also serves as the Executive Assistant of the Nelson Baptist Association. He is a graduate of Boyce College and The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. You can follow him on Twitter @Evan_Knies

 

The Reformation Means Resurrection

By Evan Knies

On the morning of October 31st 2016, my cousin’s body was laid in the grave. It has been a tough year since his passing. He was like my older brother and he impacted those he came in contact with. My cousin had his own struggles and faults, but he had his hope rested in the gospel! The temptations he faced were great, but Christ died for his past, present, and future sins. As our family has grieved losing him in this life, we have often been reminded of the hope the gospel offers. Those who repent, turning from their sin, and trusting in Christ by faith alone will be saved. Since Christ was raised from the grave, He will raise His people from the grave!

2 Corinthians 4:14 – For we know that the one who raised the Lord Jesus will also raise us with Jesus and present us with you. 
Continue reading “The Reformation Means Resurrection”

Grace from the Whirlwind: The Henryville Tornado Five Years Later

By Cade Campbell

Today, March 2, 2017 is the five year anniversary of the EF4 tornado that struck Henryville, Indiana in 2012. Cade Campbell is one of the pastors at First Baptist Church Henryville and was there when the storm hit and in the days after. This article is adapted for the anniversary from an article that Cade wrote that was published by Baptist Press (BP) on March 16, 2012, “Grace from the Whirlwind.”


O worship the King all-glorious above,
O gratefully sing his power and his love:
our shield and defender, the Ancient of Days,
pavilioned in splendor and girded with praise.

O tell of his might and sing of his grace,
whose robe is the light, whose canopy space.
His chariots of wrath the deep thunderclouds form,
and dark is his path on the wings of the storm…

– Robert Grant, “O Worship the King”

henryville-tornado-3 Continue reading “Grace from the Whirlwind: The Henryville Tornado Five Years Later”

Offices of Christ

wordswag_1488297204553

By Evan Knies

A few Sunday nights ago, we walked through this study with our students. These notes are adapted from Wayne Grudem’s Systematic. 

There were three major offices among the people of Israel in the Old Testament: the prophet (Nathan, 2 Sam. 7:2), priest (Abiathar, 1 Sam. 30:7), and king (David, 2 Sam. 5:3). In the Old Testament the prophet spoke God’s Words to the people, the priest offered sacrifices, prayers, and praises to God on the behalf of the people, and the King ruled over the people as God’s representative. These offices foreshadowed Christ and his work. Christ is the final prophet as is the Old Testament in Incarnate. The Word has become flesh as the Gospel of John. But in Hebrews 1, God has spoken in His Son. Jesus is the final Word.  Religions like Islam fail because they see Christ as a good prophet, Muhammad as a better prophet. Jesus is not a prophet, He is the prophet. God’s Word is final in his son. Christ is the final priest because he offers himself as a sacrifice on our behalf. He is King because he rules over the church and the universe. Continue reading “Offices of Christ”

Donald Trump and the Evangelical Vote

By Obbie Todd

For years scholars have debated the validity of “secularization theory,” the idea that, as society progresses, religion will irrevocably lose its authority in the public square and in society as a whole. In his monumental work A Secular Age (2007), philosopher Charles Taylor described this view as the “disenchanting” of the world through modernity, or the draining of the spiritual realm from the material. A generation of Dispensational premillennial Christians raised on the Scofield Reference Bible and Left Behind theology have perhaps unconsciously imbibed this worldview. However others aren’t as pessimistic about the trajectory of our culture. According to ecumenicist Lesslie Newbigin, “There are good grounds for saying that the secularization theory has been accepted uncritically by Christians to justify a social institution.” (The Gospel in a Pluralist Society, 215) Can a developed society actually elevate the role of religion in its political and moral culture over Continue reading “Donald Trump and the Evangelical Vote”