15 Quotes from Foundations of the Christian Faith

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James Montgomery Boice was the pastor of Tenth Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia until his death in 2000. He also wrote a book called “The Doctrines of Grace” which was heavily influential in my life.

To purchase a copy of Foundations of the Christian Faith, click here.

 

 

1. Knowledge of God takes place in the context of Christian piety, worship, and devotion (pg. 9).

2. A weak god produces no strong followers, nor does he deserve to be worshiped. A strong God, the God of the Bible, is a source of strength to those who know Him (pg. 12).

3. To know God would require change (pg. 19).

4. The church did not create the canon; if it had, it would place itself over Scripture. Rather the church submitted to Scripture as a higher authority (pg. 34).

5. The power of the living Christ operating by means of the Holy Spirit through the written Word changes lives (pg. 56).

6. A God who needs to be defended is no God. Rather, the God of the Bible is the self-existent one who is the true defender of His people (pg. 95).

7. Because God knows, believers can rest (pg. 134).

8. The blessings of salvation come, not by fighting against God’s ways or by hating Him for what we consider to be an injustice, but rather by accepting His verdict on our true nature as fallen beings and turning to Christ in faith for salvation (pg. 204).

9. The initiating cause in salvation is God’s free grace, but the formal cause is, and has always been, the death of the mediator (pg. 259).

10. In the act of propitiation, we have the great good news that the one who is our Creator, but from whom we have turned in sin, is nevertheless at the same time our Redeemer (pg. 322).

11. Only after we have come to appreciate the meaning of the Cross can we appreciate the love behind it. Seeing this, Augustine once called the Cross “a pulpit” from which Christ preached God’s love to the world (pg. 337).

12. To confess that Jesus is the Christ is to confess the Christ of the Scriptures. To deny that Christ, by whatever means, is heresy – a heresy with terrible consequences (pg. 445).

13. If we are secure in Christ, although we may stumble and fall, we know that nothing will ever pluck us out of Christ’s hand (pg. 464).

14. Living by grace actually leads to holiness, for our desire is to please the one who has saved us by that grace (pg. 492).

15. Perseverance means that once one is in the family of God, he or she is always in that family (pg. 534).

For more information on Foundations of the Christian Faith, visit Intervarsity Press here.


Evan Knies is from West Monroe, LA. He is married to Lauren and father to Maesyn. He serves as Minister of Students at Bullitt Lick Baptist Church in Shepherdsville, KY. He also serves as the Executive Assistant of the Nelson Baptist Association. He is a graduate of Boyce College and The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. You can follow him on Twitter @Evan_Knies

 

Craftiness of the Serpent and the Sovereign God: Joseph

By Evan Knies

In the later part of the book of Genesis readers are confronted with the story of Joseph. His jealous brothers sell Joseph into slavery and he is brought to Egypt. Joseph is put in places by God to carry out His Will. Before Joseph was second in command in Egypt, he did not give into temptation by laying with Pharaoh’s wife. Joseph is punished by not giving into sin.

By this action of Joseph being imprisoned, Pharaoh at a later date realizes that there is one who can interpret a dream that he has received. Pharaoh calls Joseph up to interpret a dream and throughout Joseph’s life he has remained faithful. Joseph tells of the famine that is coming and by doing this Egypt is allowed to prepare. God has taken this evil act of his brothers sending him into slavery; the tempting of Pharaoh’s wife and God is bringing all of this about for His glory. Joseph’s struggle brought life to his family and to Egypt. He saves the entire kingdom. (Victor Hamilton also compares Joseph and his brother’s evil intentions to those who conspired against Noah).[1]

When Joseph is sees his brothers again after all that has taken place, Joseph is able to say that God had brought this about. His brothers meant evil and harm against him, but God used it to save them (Genesis 50:19). Joseph uses the verb “sent” to show that it was God who brought him to Egypt, not his brothers.[3] Even though Joseph’s own flesh and blood are the ones who sold him into slavery, God providentially brought about their evil deed against Joseph to save the kingdom. The Lord placed Joseph as a leader in Egypt to keep a remnant that would continue to exist and Scripture bears this out in Exodus 1.

[1] Hamilton, Genesis, 706.

[2] Hamilton, Genesis, 577.