Book Briefs: Mere Calvinism

prpbooks_images_covers_hi-res_9781629956145.jpgJim Orrick is a professor at Boyce College in Louisville, Kentucky, as well as the author of A Year with George Herbert: A Guide to Fifty-Two of His Best Loved Poems.

Why is Mere Calvinism an important work? 

Mere Calvinism is the most helpful and accessible book on the Doctrines of Grace. Everyone can read this book and benefit from it. I think other works on the Doctrines of Grace can be very helpful, but they can miss a personal/pastoral element to the work. However, this cannot be said of Mere Calvinism. It is pastoral and personal on every page. This book shows that the Doctrines of Grace are not dull or dead, but the Doctrines of Grace are living doctrines! Throughout the work, Orrick shows that the Doctrines of Grace relate to everyday life and they should cause us to find joy in God!

Chapters in Mere Calvinism: 

1. Calvinism: More Than the Five Points 

2. Total Depravity: We Have Received a Bleak Diagnosis

3. Unconditional Election: The Father Planned for the Success of the Gospel 

4. Limited Atonement: The Son Secured the Salvation of His People 

5. Irresistible Grace: The Holy Spirit Supernaturally Calls the Elect 

6. Perseverance of the Saints: God Brings All His Children to Heaven 

7. What If?: Less Than the Five Points 

Purchase a copy of Mere Calvinism here.

Check out the Mere Calvinism Giveaway here.


Evan Knies is from West Monroe, LA. He is married to Lauren and Father to Maesyn. He serves as Minister of Students at Bullitt Lick Baptist Church in Shepherdsville, KY. He also serves as the Executive Assistant of the Nelson Baptist Association. He is a graduate of Boyce College and The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. You can follow him on Twitter @Evan_Knies

Offices of Christ

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By Evan Knies

A few Sunday nights ago, we walked through this study with our students. These notes are adapted from Wayne Grudem’s Systematic. 

There were three major offices among the people of Israel in the Old Testament: the prophet (Nathan, 2 Sam. 7:2), priest (Abiathar, 1 Sam. 30:7), and king (David, 2 Sam. 5:3). In the Old Testament the prophet spoke God’s Words to the people, the priest offered sacrifices, prayers, and praises to God on the behalf of the people, and the King ruled over the people as God’s representative. These offices foreshadowed Christ and his work. Christ is the final prophet as is the Old Testament in Incarnate. The Word has become flesh as the Gospel of John. But in Hebrews 1, God has spoken in His Son. Jesus is the final Word.  Religions like Islam fail because they see Christ as a good prophet, Muhammad as a better prophet. Jesus is not a prophet, He is the prophet. God’s Word is final in his son. Christ is the final priest because he offers himself as a sacrifice on our behalf. He is King because he rules over the church and the universe. Continue reading “Offices of Christ”

New Year Mercies

By Evan Knies

The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases;
his mercies never come to an end;
they are new every morning;
great is your faithfulness.

– Lamentations 3:22-23

This year has been tough to say the least. My family has had some trials. My wife’s family has had some trials. At the end of this year, my cousin’s passing was like a punch to the Continue reading “New Year Mercies”

Building Faith & Counting Costs: The Cost of Discipleship in a Society that Takes Faith for Granted

 

By David Brown 

buildingfaithpicFor which one of you, when he wants to build a tower, does not first sit down and calculate the cost to see if he has enough to complete it? (Luke 14:28)

In his excellent commentary on Luke’s Gospel New Testament scholar David E. Garland wrote: “ Many who come to Christ have no idea in advance what this decision will eventually cost them.”[i] The church, he continued, often makes the problem worse by soft-selling the requirements of discipleship in an effort to keep attendance high and conflict low.[ii] As a pastor I agree with Garland completely. Pastors have sometime emphasized unity within the church body at the expense of unity with Christ.

Continue reading “Building Faith & Counting Costs: The Cost of Discipleship in a Society that Takes Faith for Granted”

Donald Trump and the Evangelical Vote

By Obbie Todd

For years scholars have debated the validity of “secularization theory,” the idea that, as society progresses, religion will irrevocably lose its authority in the public square and in society as a whole. In his monumental work A Secular Age (2007), philosopher Charles Taylor described this view as the “disenchanting” of the world through modernity, or the draining of the spiritual realm from the material. A generation of Dispensational premillennial Christians raised on the Scofield Reference Bible and Left Behind theology have perhaps unconsciously imbibed this worldview. However others aren’t as pessimistic about the trajectory of our culture. According to ecumenicist Lesslie Newbigin, “There are good grounds for saying that the secularization theory has been accepted uncritically by Christians to justify a social institution.” (The Gospel in a Pluralist Society, 215) Can a developed society actually elevate the role of religion in its political and moral culture over Continue reading “Donald Trump and the Evangelical Vote”